Our Priorities

Indigenous-led Conservation

a man walks across a fallen log in the great bear rainforest with trees all around
Looking Up from the Big House Laverne Barton walks along one of the fallen logs in Dis'ju, Great Bear Rainforest, BC, Canada. © Jason Houston

We Are Committed to Working in Respectful Partnership

As an organization, Nature United believes that the increased authority and capacity of Indigenous peoples to steward their lands and waters is critical for the future of healthy ecosystems and communities. We believe there are four interconnected elements that greatly impact Indigenous authority and capacity to steward lands and waters: governance, stewardship, leadership, and local economies.

Indigenous communities must have an active decision-making role on matters pertaining to their territories. Ideally, Indigenous governments and others make and implement relevant stewardship-related laws, regulations, policies and plans based on their values and Indigenous legal frameworks. Examples of work developed in partnership:

Indigenous communities must have local people with skills and resources to implement stewardship policies and plans, including on-the-ground stewardship managers, planners, specialists, technicians, guardians, and more. In addition, communities must develop the capacity, infrastructure and sustainable finances to support their stewardship efforts and priorities over time. Examples of work developed in partnership:

Effective governance and stewardship activities need Indigenous leaders who are connected to their culture and territories, feel knowledgable and supported, are effective and impactful, and are respected by the community and others. Examples of work developed in partnership:

Indigenous-led conservation must include an economic development component (including community capacity, access to markets and entrepreneurial growth and success) that enhances cultural and ecological values while expanding opportunities for jobs and wealth creation. Examples of work developed in partnership:

  • a few people standing on shore pulling and untangling fishing nets in front of a sunny sky

    New Fishery Opportunities

    We're building the business development and management capacity of First Nations-owned and operated fisheries in B.C.

British Columbia's 21-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest is the largest coastal temperate rainforest on Earth.
Humpback Whale British Columbia's 21-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest is the largest coastal temperate rainforest on Earth. © Jon McCormack

Our Priorities

United as Nature and People

Our vision is for a sustainable Canada where nature is the foundation of human well-being, prosperity and opportunity for future generations.